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Compassionate Response to Sexual Assault Survivors

Though the #MeToo movement has brought greater media attention to sexual assault, it is not a new phenomenon. There are countless examples of congregations and denominations acting in ways that proved harmful to victims. Even the most well-intentioned leaders can inflict pain due to a lack of information and preparation. 

The Indiana Coalition to End Sexual Assault has put together a host of resources for congregations seeking to get ahead of the game. As any great leader will tell you, the best plans are laid well before they’re needed. If your congregation would like information on working with law enforcement and other professionals to form Sexual Assault Response Teams, check out the SART guide. There are also other workshops and trainings offered through ICESA that congregations can take advantage of. Finally, to gain a better perspective on the ways sexual assault impacts victims, watch the Break The Silence video.

 



 



 

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Encouragement and Engagement for the 2020 Election

A critical presidential election looms before us. Christians want to play a constructive role and make a positive difference, but often are unsure how to get involved and what issues to address. Letters to the Church seeks to help the church:


  • to think again about God’s presence and purposes in our lives and in the world

  • to shine the light and language of our faith on issues and situations that diminish individuals and threaten our common life

  • and to prompt us all to think about what it means to be the church in the face of these particular challenges and opportunities.

Designed for individuals and church study groups, the book begins with a letter to pastors and a letter to congregations. Pastors and congregations share a mutual vulnerability these days that is hampered by an inability or lack of interest in open, honest, faith-informed conversations.

What We Are Experiencing Now - letters in this section address the anxiety of often feeling on-edge and off-balance, the craving for certainty, the revival of deadly prejudices and unresolved grief.

What We Hope - readers can envision an inclusive American family portrait, the hope of trusting each other again, the desire to see courageous leadership exercised and the need for clarity between ethical commitments and political maneuvering.

What We Are Called To - letters encourage acts of confession and justice, careful and critical thinking, the need for allies, recognition of when to support and when to resist and a path for constructive engagement.

Each letter names a specific issue and describes the importance of that issue for our country and for this particular election season. Each letter concludes with reflections on “The Witness of the Church.”

Whatever the outcome of any heavily partisan election where money and shrill voices are likely to dominate, our first calling is to be the church, to be light to the world. Letters to the Church seeks to support the church in that vocation through re-centering ourselves, clarifying our commitments and engaging courageously.

 

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Tracking the Religious Response to the Pandemic

Amid much speculation and pundit prophesying about how the pandemic is affecting congregations and will reshape their future, several denominational groups and research organizations are studying the issue in real-time. This isn’t an easy task. Trying to track congregational and public reactions to the pandemic is like attempting to hit a randomly moving target. Nevertheless, much can be learned from these glimpses into the evolving response by religious leaders and the general public. The Faith Communities Today (FACT) collaborative project has attempted to archive many of these research efforts. There have been more than 20 studies so far.

What do all these reports indicate, you might ask? There are no simple summaries given the diversity of surveys, audiences, congregational sizes, and the disparity of the spread of the virus. Nevertheless, four distinct phases seem apparent in the results:

Lost and Reactive Phase – Surveys from early in the pandemic indicated that most religious groups didn’t know what to do. They reacted the best they could, but many were unsure about technology, how to offer worship virtually, whether online access and usage would be feasible for everyone, and what to do next. Religious leaders needed resources and help desperately. Congregations closed temporarily or went online with a variety of formats. There were a lot of mistakes and giving plummeted. The majority of congregations were not ready for a crisis like COVID-19.

Hardship but Hopeful Phase – By April, a number of surveys found religious groups beginning to understand the technology and getting into their virtual groove with online giving and digital ministry.  For many congregations, giving began to track upward (though not to pre-COVID levels). Congregational functioning was nothing like before, but leaders were more confident and creative outreach efforts were beginning to be implemented. Being a religious community at a distance was difficult but congregations were functioning overall. Of particular surprise to faith leaders were the large number of participants in their online worship, more than had ever attended in person. 

Resilient Stability and/or Expectations of Resurrection Phase – Into May, quite a few surveys indicated a resilience mixed with attempts at creative efforts of adaptation. At the same time, a gap began to open between Protestant churches in different locales, regions of the country, and at different ends of the theological spectrum. Much of this was likely driven by the disparity of initial outbreak patterns. More theologically moderate, urban and east coast churches expressed the desire to hunker down and remain digital as long as necessary. At the same time, some evangelical churches in the south, midwest and western portions of the U.S. began to plan for, or attempt, a phased reopening. They had a glimpse of the end of the pandemic and were preparing for it.  Giving had rebounded or was on the road to recovery for many congregations.

Exhaustion and Uncertainty Phase – By June (and anecdotally into July), as much as a third of evangelical congregations were opening, though most had not returned to in-person gatherings and were uncertain about reopening timelines. At the same time, positive cases were beginning to spike in parts of the country previously untouched by the virus. Uncertainty and anxiety were evident in the public, with nearly two-thirds of Americans saying they were somewhat or very uncomfortable attending an in-person religious service. This same tension is being felt within congregations with some members having to return to work while other remain at home, so some are more comfortable gathering than others. In every case, however, both clergy and congregational members are exhausted due to the continual anxiety about the virus (especially as it is now dramatically increasing), uncertainty about a clear way forward to “normalcy,” and the significant additional effort it takes to do virtual ministry with added pastoral care and social ministry demands. 

With no clear end in sight, the religious response to the pandemic continues. Check the FACT site regularly for new research as the impact continues to be assessed and reported.

 

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Racism

The always present reality of racism has revealed itself again through recent, senseless deaths. Racism is abhorrent. In the United States, racism is a cruel epidemic. It steals the breath of Black People and other people of color. Center for Congregations board member Dr. Alton Pollard recently commented, "The experience of Black America extends beyond death. Social death is no less real from disparities and inequities to disease and all manner of injustice." Racism has no place in our communities of faith.

There are excellent resources for courageous conversations about race. Congregations seeking an anti-racist journey are invited to explore this collection from Center president Tim Shapiro. We want to know your experience using these resources and on each you’ll see a box to tell us what you think. Also, feel free to suggest others that you find helpful. 

 

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Money Matters for Youth: Integrating Faith and Finances
Written by a faith-based financial services organization, this download offers a seven-session curriculum for youth on finances.
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Necessary Endings
This book guides readers to determine what activities and beliefs are worth keeping or ending so they can move forward and experience authentic human flourishing.
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What does it mean for a ministry to be trauma-informed?
This short article gives an overview of trauma-informed organizations and offers six key principles for ministries to adopt.
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Faith Trust Institute
This organization offers online trainings, resources, and consulting addressing sexual and domestic violence in faith communities.
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Joining God, Remaking Church, Changing the World: The New Shape of the Church in Our Time
This book explores how a neighborhood-based faith congregation can leave an impact on the community using practices modeled by Jesus.
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The Congregational Resource Guide
The CRG (Congregation Resource Guide) is an online tool designed to help leaders of all congregations find the right resources to address their unique challenges and needs. Funded by Lilly Endowment Inc., the Center for Congregations was founded in 1997 to help Indiana congregations address their needs through resource consulting, educational events and grants.
Learn more about the CRG
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